Musical fun for the under 5's in and around Oxford, UK
people enjoying the beach

An English seaside, cricket, windbreaks and wetsuits!

This traditional seaside song is over a hundred years old, written by John A Glover-Kind in 1907, but it has been used in many film and TV shows since, from “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” 1939 to “Thomas and the Quarry Engine” 2014.

It’s a great song for moving along to and we use it as a dancing, circle song in the family sessions, where the (slightly saucy) middle words changed to encourage movement.   Have Fun!

Original
Rachel’s version
Oh I do like to be beside the seaside
Oh I do like to be beside the seaside
Oh I do like to be beside the sea Oh I do like to be beside the sea
Oh I do like to stroll along the Prom, Prom, Prom Oh I do like to stroll along the Prom, Prom, Prom
Where the Brass Band plays, ‘tiddly-om, pom, pom’ Where the Brass Band plays, ‘tiddly-om, pom, pom’
So just let me be beside the seaside Oh I do like to be beside the seaside
I’ll be beside myself with glee Oh I do like to be beside the sea
There’s a lot of girls beside, I should like to be beside I like to paddle in and out, I like to scream, I like to shout
Beside the seaside, beside the sea Beside the seaside, beside the sea

 

As an interesting aside here is an excerpt from my grandfather’s memoirs about a holiday in Bridlington in 1910.  Many of things have changed for the better but the reluctance of a small boy to get cold and wet endures always, even to please his enthusiastic father!

Not a moment could be wasted. Bathing was the first requirement. We used Machines (small huts on wheel, drawn by a horse) which we entered by the door at the back on the dry sand. A few minutes were allowed to undress and don bathing suits, then the hut lurched down to the water to the depth of the horse’s undercarriage. The shafts and horse were then attached to the back of the hut for the return journey so there was no escape except by the front door – into the water.
The interior of the hut was so damp you would have though a bit more water wouldn’t bother us, but bathing hygiene was not good in those days. It wasn’t only the contributions from the horses, the town sewage was also piped into the sea on an ebb tide.
“Keep your Mouth Shut Boys, beware of Ran Taddle!” was a constant warning.
The Pater would dive in, surfacing with an exclamation of “Magnificent!” Mother meanwhile, sat in a deckchair with a large hat to keep the sun off. She would have looked extremely elegant if she had not been festooned with the Pater’s coat and waistcoat containing his wallet, gold watch, chain and sovereign case, plus wing collar, bowtie and bowler hat. (Leisure clothing was an unknown concept and, as far as I can recall, it was not until after WWI that men even discarded ties and wore open-necked shirts on holiday)
In the Machine the Pater changed what he still wore of his clothing for a bathing costume. This reached from his calves to his neck and had short sleeves. On top he wore a separate skirt for modesty’s sake. It was in navy blue with white braid borders.
“Warm when you are in!” he would shout from the swirling waters. I never knew if he was referring to his bathing costume of if he was selling the North Sea to his reluctant sons.